The end of Most Good, Least Harm and the end of the blog…

Alright, I’ve given it a go and it isn’t my thing. My original goal was to make two posts/week and I, for the most part, haven’t been able to hit one post every other week. The act of writing is frustrating and time consuming. Reading has started feeling like work and I’ve felt guilty for reading books that aren’t on my official blog list. I have other projects that I’ve been neglecting. So, I’m calling this quits. I’m going to work on my novel and see what I can do to bring a branch of The Thirty Million Words Initiative to Milwaukee. I’m going to read books on a whim and check out new musical artists. If something really strikes me, I might pop on here and share it, but I imagine those times will be few and far between. Here is my wrap-up of Zoe Weil’s Most Good, Least Harm.

Ten Principles for a MOGO Life

Commit to the three Is: Inquire, Introspect, live with Integrity–I like using this rule to guide my life. Most of my inquiries relate to my interest in education. If I see an article about kids and healthy food, I ask myself if it can be incorporated into a school lunch program. When I saw Michael Moore’s documentary, Where to Invade Next, I wondered how Finland’s education system could work here in the states. So, I read from a variety of sources, I watch a lot of documentaries, and then I meld what I’ve learned with my primary interests of education and poverty. There are many things that I’ve learned and thought about that I haven’t acted on yet. I need to learn about who to present my ideas to rather than shouting into the void…individual teachers, the local school board, the State Superintendent of Schools, the United States Secretary of Education? In the meantime I donate when I can, mostly to teachers through DonorsChoose.org. Sometimes I order books for a local organization called Stork & Company which provides baby boxes to new parents.

Work for change–Oh, I guess I covered that in the last section. I will say that I am re-reading Thirty Million Words by Dana Suskind. When I am finished I will contact their organization to see what I might have to do to start a branch here in Milwaukee. Basically TMW works with the 0-3 set, insuring that little ones are exposed to a lot of language early in life so they are ready for preschool. I am also considering volunteering to rock babies at Aurora Sinai hospital.

Rethink, Reuse, Repair, and Recycle–This one is not one of my strong points. I do rethink (and I consult references such as Ellis Jones’ book The Better World Shopping Guide) before I make most purchases. I would like to re-read the book Choose to Reuse. I don’t repair much and I would like to work on that. I’m getting better at recycling, especially since my building has brought in more bins to accommodate the number of residents.

Eat for life–I became a vegetarian on January 1st and it’s going well. I do eat a lot of dairy products and some eggs, but I can see myself going vegan at some point. I’m just not their yet. I have made the switch to almond milk.

Reduce your ecological footprint–I need to get into better physical shape. Right now I can (sort of, with a walking stick) walk to the bus stop, but I am unable to walk from the bus stop back to my apartment. Once I fix that I won’t be dependent on rides as much. That’s probably the biggest thing I can reduce at this point.

Transform education–Okay, I have fully covered this already. Please refer to the first two sections in this post if you’ve already forgotten.

Invest your money ethically–I don’t have a lot of money to invest at this point. I don’t feel too bad about my bank, but I am stuck there, at least for the time being. If I could change, I would switch to a Community Development Financial Institution. I would also look into a financial institution called Aspiration (admittedly, I know little about it at this time). Keep in mind that choosing a financial institution is among the most important things you can do.

Build community–Funny thing about this, it’s what I was trying to do with this blog, but I don’t have many followers and I really don’t have the desire to work for more. I have made a significant step in this area by joining the Greenfield Woman’s Club a few months back.

Teach others–I’m pretty good at this, mostly from sharing thoughts and ideas on Facebook. Also, talking to fellow members at my church, and as I mentioned in the last section, the women of my club. So, the blog didn’t work out. I would like to teach by writing books. I would also like to present the ideas related to education to the appropriate people.

Strive for balance–This is something that I’ve been working on and must continue. I have a hard time saying no to people when anything is suggested that might make the world a better place. I need to put limits on my donations, shifting more to volunteering my time. Also, now that I’m in a pretty good place in my mental health issues, I need to focus more on my physical health.

In peace and health,

Lisa B

 

 

Activism, Volunteerism, and Democracy

In Most Good, Least Harm, Zoe Weil writes, “If the opposite of an activist is one who is passive, then all who endeavor to create a better world, rather than passively accepting the status quo, are activists.” This warms my heart as I have several barriers that keep me from being the activist I dream of being, including not being able to stand long enough to attend most rallies and marches. I do what I can, and today that means writing my blog. Education is the base of my activism, with poverty and gun control issues close behind, in particular how they affect the ability to be a successful student.

I’m always on the lookout for ways I can volunteer. Two such ideas of late are learning to knit or crochet to make simple projects for the homeless (scarves and hats) and those transitioning to home life (dish cloths and pot holders), and doing research for early elementary school teachers (combing the internet for free or inexpensive projects that fit with their lessons). I haven’t acted on them yet, but I feel the simple act of adding them to my list is a step. Even baby steps count.

VOTE! I vote in every election and encourage you to do so as well. Today, here in Wisconsin, we have a primary for Justice of the Supreme Court. I know that it would be easy to blow this one off, what with the off-year and icky weather, but please don’t. Your voice counts. More than voting, vote intelligently. Do your research and follow your personal moral compass. 2018 is a big year for all of us. Read up on the issues, go to events, pick your candidates and volunteer and/or donate if you are able.

Until next time,

Lisa B

Upcoming materials

DVD/Study Guide: Jesus, Bombs, and Ice Cream by Shane Claiborne and Ben Cohen (he’s the Ben of Ben & Jerry’s–grab a pint and dig in!)

Book: Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser; Film–Fast Food Nation w/audio commentary; Documentary–Manufacturing Fast Food Nation; Shorts–The Meatrix I and II; News on Fight for $15 campaign

Book: Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone

DVD/Discussion Guide: The Economics of Happiness

Book: Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor by Virginia Eubanks

Book: Dirt The Erosion of Civilizations by David R. Montgomery; Documentary–Dirt! The Movie

Work…right livelihood

I was born to be a teacher. My Dad, Aunt Pat, Grandma and Grandpa B., and Gram Q. had all been teachers. I played school until all of my friends got fed up with all the homework I assigned. In second grade I volunteered with a special ed. art class. It seemed I was destined to be a teacher. So…I went into marketing management instead.

It wasn’t quite that abrupt. In eighth grade I signed up for the marketing specialty program to ensure I would go to my neighborhood high school (were I to choose that school today, I may be on track to work in engineering or biomedical sciences). In the beginning it was still my intention to teach, joining the Young Educators’ Society. But marketing came easily to me and I was earning credits for college, so that was the route I took.

I remember career day. I went to a marketing related talk (because I knew that’s the field I was going into), as well as a talk about becoming a police officer, and another on joining the military (I didn’t take career day very seriously–I knew that my deaf ear would keep me out of the last two options). I also remember spending some time pouring over the Occupational Outlook Handbook, being encouraged to take into consideration career projection and salary. Finally, I took an aptitude test that told me I was well suited to become a farmer (it sounded dreadful at the time, but I do feel a sort of longing when I watch documentaries about organic farming).

I wish that, over the course of my schooling, I had been encouraged to not only evaluate my career aptitude, but to explore my personal values and interests as well, spending time to find a career that fit all three. I can’t turn back time, so this is now my wish for today’s students. The Solutionary Program offered by the Institute for Humane Education is a good start. As is the Graduation Pledge Alliance.

Jumping to the present, or maybe the future…if you are comfortable with your present career and it gives you a sense of purpose, great! If not, how can you bring your life more in line with your values? I wish that everyone who wanted to could quit their jobs to do something more fulfilling, but I know that isn’t reality. See if your company does employee matching of donations, and if not, see if they would be open to the idea. Perhaps you could start a volunteer group which picks different projects to work on during off time (e.g. working a shift at a food bank)…maybe your employer would spring for matching t-shirts (organic and union made, I hope!) for your group. Maybe you can start a recycling or composting program. Think about what is important to you and see how you can incorporate it into your work life.

If you would like to make a major change, but don’t know where to start, consider volunteering. Walk dogs at your local Humane Society, rock babies at a local hospital, lead hikes at a nature center, work the gift shop at an assisted care facility. There are many ways you can help, and sometimes volunteer positions lead to paid positions.

Until next time,

Lisa B

Upcoming materials

DVD/Study Guide: Jesus, Bombs, and Ice Cream by Shane Claiborne and Ben Cohen (he’s the Ben of Ben & Jerry’s–grab a pint and dig in!)

Book: Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser; Film–Fast Food Nation w/audio commentary; Documentary–Manufacturing Fast Food Nation; Shorts–The Meatrix I and II; News on Fight for $15 campaign

Book: Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone

DVD/Discussion Guide: The Economics of Happiness

Book: Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor by Virginia Eubanks

Book: Dirt The Erosion of Civilizations by David R. Montgomery; Documentary–Dirt! The Movie

Let’s go shopping!

Chapters 3 and 4 of Zoe Weil’s book Most Good, Least harm are on products and food, respectively. I’m combining them into one post because to me they are closely intertwined. I love shopping. I love researching products and companies to see how I can do the most good on a rather limited budget. I think it’s fun, like working on a puzzle. I’m not perfect. I’m not immune to impulse purchases (but I try to find out information after-the-fact and if it wasn’t a particularly good choice, I try to avoid it the next time I am tempted).

Some tools I use… First and foremost, my library card! My favorite tool in evaluating a company is a handy little purse-sized book called the better world shopping guide by Ellis Jones. It’s a jumping off point for me. For example, it doesn’t take into account parent companies. Ben and Jerry’s is rated an A- while Breyer’s ice cream is rated a D, but both are owned by Unilever. I do still buy Ben and Jerry’s on occasion, but I am more likely to buy a locally produced frozen dessert. I have the companion app, Better World Shopper, and the Leaping Bunny app which provides information on companies which use animal testing, on my phone. Last, but not least, there’s my computer. I can look up information (hint: remember that companies’ official sites have highly paid people to make them look good, so if you’re serious, poke around a bit), find local stores that carry the items I’m looking for, and contact companies directly for more information.

What I don’t buy…There are several companies that I boycott…Walmart (workers rights issues–did you know that Walmart has a history of buying so-called dead peasant insurance–taking out life insurance policies out on their low-level employees? Check out Michael Moore’s Capitalism: A Love Story, available on Netflix, to rent or buy on Amazon, or readily available through the Milwaukee Public Library system), Coca-Cola (anti-union–did you know that Coca Cola had Colombian workers executed for belonging to a union? Watch The Cost of a Coke), Kraft-Heinz (tucked between Exxon-Mobile and Walmart, K-H is ranked the second worst company in the world, second worst company to work for, and Bernardo Hees is among the worst CEOs), Nestle (learn about Nestle’s scandalous water bottling at Storyofstuff.org, did you know that in the past Nestle made their baby formula available to poor regions just long enough for new mothers’ milk to dry up making them dependent on formula they could not afford? Here’s an article from Business Insider), among others.

I admit it. I’m a bit of a shopaholic. Clothing is the worst. I adore t-shirts and the true cost of a conventional tee is sickening, from cotton crops heavily sprayed with pesticides to assembly in horrid sweatshop conditions. If you’d like more information, check out the documentary The True Cost, available streaming on Netflix. Why would I participate in this system? Honestly, I’m on the large side and there aren’t a lot of organic or fair trade options in 4X clothes. Also, I’m losing weight. I’ve gone down four jeans sizes in just over a year. I keep meaning to hit the thrift stores, and I will, but for whatever reason, I’ve been dragging my heals. I’m down to a 3X, which means that I have reached one of my goals…to be able to order tees from Syracuse Cultural Workers and Life is Good (I did order one from LiG this morning, along with Life is Good: The Book).

As of January 1st, I am a vegetarian. I chose to make this change because it’s a kinder way to live. I tried it on Thanksgiving, but realized that it wasn’t something I could jump into willy-nilly. So, I stepped back. I ordered a couple of vegetarian cookbooks and stocked up on essentials. I ordered a selection of spices and seasonings (in the 13 years of living in my apartment, I’ve only had pepper…also, I’ve never had the pilot light on my stove lit). I’m having a lot of fun with it. My grocery stores, in order of preference, are Outpost (local co-op; pricey, but they have the locally produced Simple Soyman veggie burgers that I like), El Rey (local chain; reasonably priced; I get most of my Mexican food there), Sendik’s (another local chain; pricey, but handy in a pinch), and Aldi (I guess this is a regional chain; shares a parent company with Trader Joe’s; reasonably priced; good selection of organic foods; newly introduced vegetarian line). So, I try to keep it local, but I can’t always afford it. I do the best I can.

In general, I try to keep four things in mind when making a purchase, edible or not…local, organic, union, and fair trade. Something else I look for is whether the purchase supports a cause I believe in. I am striving to add second-hand to the list, but I still need to work on that one.

Until next time,

~Lisa B

Upcoming materials

DVD/Study Guide: Jesus, Bombs, and Ice Cream by Shane Claiborne and Ben Cohen (he’s the Ben of Ben & Jerry’s–grab a pint and dig in!)

Book: Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser; Film–Fast Food Nation w/audio commentary; Documentary–Manufacturing Fast Food Nation; Shorts–The Meatrix I and II; News on Fight for $15 campaign

Book: Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone

DVD/Discussion Guide: The Economics of Happiness

Book: The Turning Point: Science, Society, and the Rising Culture by Fritjof Capra; Film–MindWalk

Book: Dirt The Erosion of Civilizations by David R. Montgomery; Documentary–Dirt! The Movie

I’m back…with seven keys to MOGO living

Well, my physical issues aren’t resolved, but I’m working on them and I feel it’s time to get back to my readers. As you know, I am reading Zoe Weil’s book Most Good, Least Harm and today’s blog is on chapter 2–Seven Keys to MOGO. I am going to present the ideas and give a brief example of how I apply them to my life.

Key 1–Live Your Epitaph

If you have completed the MOGO Questionnaire and Action Plan, then you’ve already written your epitaph. If you haven’t, please take a moment to think about what you would like people to say about you when you are gone. My epitaph, unchanged since I first wrote it almost a decade ago, is “The world is a better place because Lisa was in it.” When I review and revise my questionnaire in April, I want to tweak it. I believe that by including something about education and poverty will give my life more focus and thus make my efforts more effective.

Key 2–Pursue Joy Through Service

Most people feel great joy when they volunteer, thus combining joy and service in this key. My big volunteer effort is delivering meals to the elderly on the holidays on which Meals on Wheels doesn’t deliver (Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter). I also belong to a service club, The Greenfield Women’s Club. I have been seeking other ways to help. I am considering helping the quilters when they meet at my church. I am also thinking about learning how to crochet so that I can make simple things like dish cloths and pot holders for people who are moving into homes after having experienced homelessness, and scarves for whoever is in need.

Key 3–Make Connections and Self-Reflect

Making connections and reflecting how my choices affect the chain fascinates me. It isn’t easy, and I don’t do it all the time, but it’s satisfying when I do and it helps to show how I can make a difference. I love Zoe’s example of how obesity is tied to the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. I will let you read that in Most Good, Least Harm, or try to figure it out yourself. Sometimes I start from the middle. I made a chart starting with our dependence on fossil fuels. I came up with many health issues, veterans’ issues, environmental issues. It was pretty eye-opening.

Key 4–Model Your Message and Work for Change

I think this one is pretty obvious. I used to get a little uncomfortable telling people all the things I do to make the world a better place, like I was tooting my own horn. Then I thought about it…I don’t tell people things to puff myself up. I share what I’ve learned and how I’ve changed as a result because I want to inspire them. I want them to see that someone like me, with mental and physical setbacks, can make a difference and they can, too.

I do my part to make the world a better place. I visit the click-to-donate sites Greater Good Network and Care2.com daily. I research purchases when I can, which is almost all the time (it helps that I keep the most current copy of Ellis Jones’ The Better World Shopping Guide in my purse). I give to causes that are important to me, primarily in the areas of education and poverty. A couple weeks ago I became a vegetarian, which I love! Between my personal Facebook page, my MOGO Milwaukee Facebook page and this blog, I model my life by posting my actions and choices and post relevant news stories that I encounter. (I don’t post everything. I don’t want to be viewed as obnoxious, just helpful.)

Key 5–Find and Create Community

Find people who share your values and build on each other’s enthusiasm. Meetup.com is a great place to start. There are groups on their site that cover just about any topic you can think of. Maybe you just want to interact with a virtual community through social media. That’s what I thought I wanted, but then a friend on Facebook sent me an invite to a community cookout. I ordered a bunch of postcards from Syracuse Cultural Workers and handed them out as an ice-breaker. I’ve made a couple real life friends as a result.

Key 6–Take Responsibility

It is so easy to say, “It’s not my fault,” “I didn’t make this mess,” “It’s hopeless.” I try to live by the following…Live as though everyone is putting forth as much effort as I am to make the world a better place. So, I try to learn as much as I can about what’s going on the world, how I affect it, and how I can change. I’ve cut way back on my chocolate intake. I’ve tried this in the past for health reasons and couldn’t stick to it. Then I learned that most chocolate is produced with slave labor. Now I will occasionally get some chocolate from Equal Exchange or Divine, two responsible companies. I’ve learned that helping (or not hurting) others is a much better motivator for me than changing for my own good. Take responsibility and figure out your best motivator. Change when you can and don’t be too hard on yourself when you backslide.

Key 7–Strive for Balance

Talk about saving the best for last. This is so important! It has been my intent to make two budgets–a monetary budget and a time budget. I haven’t done it yet, but I’ll try soon. I need a monetary budget because I have this habit of giving a lot of money (either charitable donations or buying all local/organic/pricier foods) at the beginning of the month and freaking out when the end of the month comes. As for time, I always intend to spend a good chunk of my time researching (watching documentaries, reading books and articles) or creating (art projects or working on my novel), but I usually end up spending much more time playing solitaire and watching shows on Netflix. In short, I need to spend less and create more. Find your balance.

This was a much longer than usual post. It was a long chapter which I was going to break into smaller chunks, but I’m feeling pretty good today and so I’m playing a bit of catch up. Thank you if you’ve read all the way to the end. As always, your comments are most welcome!

~Lisa B

It’s official! Living the MOGO life.

Ahhh…it seems like a long time since I made my first preview post. I hope the new year is finding everyone in good spirits. I like to read Zoe Weil’s book Most Good, Least Harm around this time of year, and so have chosen it as the first text to cover. I’ve been doing this fairly consistently since Zoe was the pulpit guest in May 2010 when I was a member of The First Unitarian Society of Milwaukee (I have since returned to my Lutheran roots). I took the MOGO (Most Good) workshop following the service which was led by Zoe’s colleague, Kim Korona. That day was among the most influential of my life and I hope to give you a taste of living a MOGO life over the next couple weeks. I hope you’ll join me.

Before reading Most Good, Least Harm, I do the MOGO Questionnaire and Action Plan located in the back of the book (also available online). I would like to encourage you to complete the questionnaire if you feel moved to. You don’t need to read the book, but I do encourage you to do that as well. I like the questionnaire because you start each section with a sort of inventory of the things you already do…I think you’ll be surprised! My most challenging undertaking this time around is going vegetarian (today it’s official!). I tried to make the switch on Thanksgiving, but realized that I jumped the gun, so I stepped back. In preparing for this, I ordered two microwave vegetarian cookbooks, a ton of spices, and I stocked up my pantry with essentials. I’m feeling really good about this. All in all I guess I’ve identified 20-25 changes that I would like to make in the next three months. Most of them are easy, some I’ve already done, some are on my schedule to do this week, some others will get done, and some will show up when I redo the questionnaire in April. Still others will reappear some time in the future. Don’t judge yourself if you backslide. It happens to me often and then one day it becomes ingrained.

Yesterday I started reading Most Good, Least Harm, completing the introduction and the first chapter. The first chapter covers, among other things, the five elements of humane education (the art of teaching how to live a MOGO life). The four main elements are providing accurate information (watch out for fake news!), the 3 Cs (curiosity, creativity, and critical thinking), the 3 Rs (reverence, respect, and responsibility), and offering positive choices and tools for problem solving. The fifth element is the 3 Is (inquiry, introspection, and integrity). I will be following these guidelines as I build my blog. I’m not giving any further information on these elements (I can’t tell you everything or you won’t buy the book…disclaimer: I am not getting any kick-backs for this or any other book or DVD. If that changes, I will be sure to let you know.). If you have specific questions, feel free to leave them in the comments…

Until next time (Friday?), ~Lisa B

Upcoming materials

DVD/Study Guide: Jesus, Bombs, and Ice Cream by Shane Claiborne and Ben Cohen (he’s the Ben of Ben & Jerry’s–grab a pint and dig in!)

Book: Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser; Film–Fast Food Nation w/audio commentary; Documentary–Manufacturing Fast Food Nation; Shorts–The Meatrix I and II; News on Fight for $15 campaign

Book: Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone

DVD/Discussion Guide: The Economics of Happiness

Book: The Turning Point: Science, Society, and the Rising Culture by Fritjof Capra; Film–MindWalk

Book: Dirt The Erosion of Civilizations by David R. Montgomery; Documentary–Dirt! The Movie

 

Two weeks to go…and a bit about values

This is my final preview post before the official Notes From an Eclectic Heart kick-off on January 1st. Today I ran off a crisp and clean copy of the MOGO Questionnaire from Zoe Weil’s book Most Good, Least Harm, which will be the first text I cover in the new year. It isn’t necessary (helpful, but not necessary) to read the book in order to fill out the questionnaire. If nothing else, it’s a good way to get New Year’s resolutions in order. Doing this exercise has helped me make real, positive changes in my life over the years.

Last week, my friend, Cindy, posted the following on Facebook: Name a few of your top favorite qualities in other people. Some of my favorites are compassion, honesty, playfulness, healthy curiosity, and a sense of humor. It occurred to me that those are also my favorite qualities in myself. This was helpful because the first question on the MOGO Questionnaire deals with your most important qualities (virtues).

This evening I watched Session One of Resistance School. In it, Timothy McCarthy asks the viewers what their non-negotiables are. What is most important to you and, more telling, why? Family? Freedom? The world’s best egg salad recipe? This is something to really ponder. I still need to firm up my answers, myself.

So, questions for you (it would be great if you’d leave your answers in the comments):

What are your favorite qualities in other people? In yourself? Do the answers differ? If so, how?

What are your non-negotiables? Why?

In what movie is the protagonist seeking the world’s best egg salad recipe?

Visit the Welcome post to check out the upcoming texts and films I will be covering.

~Lisa B

One month to go

I had intended to post this on December 1st, but I threw my back out last week and it has been difficult to sit at the computer. This is really just a reminder that the official kick off day for Notes From an Eclectic Heart will be January 1st, 2018. I am starting by re-reading Most Good, Least Harm by Zoe Weil. Using the link, you can order a copy of the book and download the discussion guide, the MOGO Questionnaire (which I will have done myself prior to January 1st), and an interview with the author. I truly hope that you will join me on my journey.

~Lisa B

Welcome

I’m starting this blog as a sort of mental travel journal. Beginning January 1, 2018, I am going on an adventure of the mind. Many of the ideas I will be exploring are not new to me, but I think will be helpful to revisit. On the other hand there will be material which I have not yet experienced. New or not, I hope to initiate an ongoing dialogue with fellow activists (or as Zoe Weil calls us, solutionaries). I plan on posting entries approximately twice per week. I hope you will join me. Together we can make the world a better place. My initial series is as follows:

Book: Most Good, Least Harm by Zoe Weil (I will have done the MOGO Questionnaire    prior to January 1st); Class notes from the Better World, Meaningful Life course offered through the Institute for Humane Education in fall 2013.

DVD/Study Guide: Jesus, Bombs, and Ice Cream by Shane Claiborne and Ben Cohen (he’s the Ben of Ben & Jerry’s–grab a pint and dig in!)

Book: Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser; Film–Fast Food Nation w/audio commentary; Documentary–Manufacturing Fast Food Nation; Shorts–The Meatrix I and II; News on Fight for $15 campaign

Book: Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy by Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone

DVD/Discussion Guide: The Economics of Happiness

Book: The Turning Point: Science, Society, and the Rising Culture by Fritjof Capra; Film–MindWalk